Music Therapy

Music therapy is an evidence-based, allied healthcare profession that is facilitate by board-certified and licensed music therapists (MT-BC: music therapist-board certified).

Music therapy utilizes the neurological perception and aesthetic experience of music to facilitate physical, cognitive, emotional, social, and spiritual wellness. Music therapists go through rigorous training through an undergraduate or master’s program, clinical internship, and board examination. Oregon requires that all music therapists be licensed through the state and complete the required continuing education credits.

Music therapy is founded in a therapeutic relationship. Music therapy is a process-orient experience, without the concern of a polished product. Music therapy does not require musical skill or experience. Instruments are provided, and the client’s unique interests are taken into consideration.

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“When we look at the body of evidence that the arts contribute to our society, it’s absolutely astounding. Music Therapists are breaking down the walls of silence and affliction of autism, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.” -Michael Greene, President and CEO of NARAS, 1997

What We Do

Basically, we use music to improve physical, social, cognitive, emotional, and spiritual wellness. But that doesn’t really explain the what or how of music therapy. Anything you can do with music, that’s what music therapists use for therapeutic experiences.

Music therapists use:

  • Playing instruments
  • Singing
  • Improvisation
  • Active music listening
  • Receptive listening
  • Music assisted relaxation
  • Lyric analysis
  • Music appreciation
  • Adapted music instructions
  • Songwriting
  • Musical games
  • Playlist creation/song share
  • Community-based performance
  • And so much more!

Assessment + Plan

Your first music therapy session will be structured to understand your unique strengths and opportunities to give you the best experience possible. The first session can involve music making, music listening, and discussion to develop a positive therapeutic relationship. The music therapist will then write a summary of the assessment, and develop a treatment plan with long and short term goals.

For more information about music therapy, visit

The American Music Therapy Association
The Certification Board for Music Therapists
The Oregon Association of Music Therapists

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